Archive for Interaction Design - page 5

Micromodes

When a user, knowingly or unknowingly, initiates a mode that lasts for the duration of a single action, then turns off, it’s a micromode.

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Kicker Tea Project: Introduction

As consultants who specialize in new technology, a lot of our work is under NDA, so every once in a while, we do a project just for ourselves, to strut. (Last year it was the Kicker Conference Phone.) This time, we wanted to design a product for the home and we focused on an activity many of us enjoy: tea drinking.

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Ghost Fingers Typing for Tablet Devices

Tablet computers offer a unique opportunity to rethink how we type, mostly because traditional touch typing doesn’t work well on them unless the tablet is resting on a flat surface, like a desk or a lap. But most of the time, we’re holding tablets, which turns typing into a process of hunt-and-peck with one hand while the other hand tries to hold the tablet steady. Keyboard solutions from mobile phones don’t work well either; they just aren’t designed for the larger screen space, and spaced out keys make for a Fitts’ Law nightmare.

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3x2x2: A New Method of Thumb Typing for Tablet Computers

Fast Company has an article 3 Ways the iPad Could Kill QWERTY. I find it unlikely that QWERTY as a typing construct is going to go away, as the system and the keyboards we know now have evolved over decades to its current refined state. See, for instance, this collection of early typewriter keyboards. However, I do think tablet PCs such as the iPad offer other possibilities for typing, especially given that typing using touchscreen keyboards as they currently are, well, sucks.

Two new typing configurations I’ve considered revolve around how we hold tablet PCs. Typically, unless you are using a stylus, a tablet is held with two hands, with thumbs on the front or side of the device, and your four remaining fingers on the back. It’s a natural, grasping gesture for humans. This leans me to think there there could be two possible new typing methods: one typing using your fingers on the back of the device by making use of ghost fingers, and another typing with just your thumbs using the screen on the front of the device.

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Cinematic Reading

What you have here is what I call cinematic reading. The “camera” moves from item to item like a camera would, or like your eye would if you were scanning the page, then stopping to read different items: text to partial image to fuller image to whole page, in a variety of configurations. You can, of course, manually override it via double tap or pinching/spreading. But it offers a solution that could be applied to other combinations of text and image: that is, reading that isn’t books or mostly text articles. Namely: magazines.

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Mobile Touchscreen Cut and Paste Comparison

A comparison across platforms of the solutions to cut and paste on mobile devices with touchscreens.

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Content: Not Always King

Content strategy is all well and good, of course, but it has brought with it the rallying cry of “Content First!” and a million articles about how “Content is King.” Content is king…except when it’s not.

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The Top Ten Essential Interaction Design Books

As this is the season of lists and of gift giving, I thought I would put together the top ten books I thought every designer of interactive products should have in their library.

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Tap is the New Click

After giving this talk over a dozen times over the last two years, I’ve decided to retire Tap is the New Click. Here are the slides.

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Design, Art, and Advertising

There is a crucial difference between design and advertising, and it is the same difference as between art and design, and that is intent.

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New blog post: Eyes on the Road! Or why my car should NOT be a giant smartphone on wheels: http://t.co/O4Z8OJ3N6S4 hours ago